5 Reasons Why We Stan the Women’s March

5 Reasons Why We Stan the Women’s March


Another orbit around the sun, another year of patriarchal nonsense.

Flashback to January 2017, about one million women united across the nation in response to the election of Donald J. Trump. This formidable turnout was designed to send a message: that despite the fact that the hallowed rooms of the White House were now occupied by a heathen who openly displayed his disdainful treatment of women, whilst doubling down on his antiquated viewpoints, the women of the United States were not going to let the situation rest easy. We took to the streets, we raised our heads in defiance, and we roared.

Whilst some mocked, and questioned what marching could possibly hope to accomplish (ah, naysayers. An omnipresent aspect of every woman’s life), those who took to the streets to make their voices heard stood steadfast in their conviction that marching to show their discontent served as a call to action for all those who felt that they system was not working for them.

This year, we asked a number of our own Muslim Girl writers why they believed that the Women’s March remains integral to our democracy. Here’s what they had to say:

 

1. “It’s important to march because the Women’s March symbolizes our unity, and lets our voices be heard clearer.” – Pegah Smiley

 

2. “It gives us an opportunity to stand with members of different communities, and show that we’re working to fight for their rights as well.” – Anum Ahmed

 

3. “It’s so important to participate in the March if you can, because it shows the younger generation that your voice DOES matter.” – Mariam Tanvir

 

4. “It’s important to march because when we march, we’re proving that we won’t let injustice be the driving force of our country, and that we have a strong desire for change.” – Vanessa ElShamy

 

5. “The Women’s March, in my opinion, is a display of unity, love, and commitment to deconstructing unjust systems in order to create a better future for ourselves, and our youth.” – Nada Mousa

 



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