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Are You Prepared for Marriage and Building a Family?

Are You Prepared for Marriage and Building a Family?

By Mona Islam High School is that time which is ideal for preparing yourself for the rest of your life. There is so much excitement and opportunity. Youth is a time of energy, growth, health, beauty, and adventure. Along with the thrill of being one […]

Protests Erupt in Sudan Against Al Bashir’s Corrupt Government

Protests Erupt in Sudan Against Al Bashir’s Corrupt Government

This past April 6th, 2019 marked a historic day in Sudanese history. Thousands upon thousands of people took to the streets of Sudan to protest against the government and demand the world’s attention to the atrocities going on in the land of gold. Of all […]

How Much Longer Before We Start Holding All Cops Responsible for Racially-Based Fatalities?

How Much Longer Before We Start Holding All Cops Responsible for Racially-Based Fatalities?


Racially-biased standards in the justice system might seem like an oxymoron, however, the conviction of an ex-cop in Florida for the 2015 shooting of a black man, Corey Jones, has raised some eyebrows.

Nouman Raja, a former police officer, was found guilty and convicted of manslaughter and attempted murder. For his crimes, he will be facing a minimum sentence of 25 years behind bars. This also happens to be the first time in 30 years that an officer in Florida has been convicted of an on-duty shooting.

A conviction entirely justified, the sense of peace felt by the family of Corey Jones — a house inspector and part-time musician — is the least that can suffice after having their loved one cruelly taken away from them because of yet another trigger-happy police officer.

The reality is, these racially-based shootings are costing society so much more than the justice system is taking accountability for. According to research, there are about 1,000 police shootings each year in the United States, and to no one’s surprise, black men are three times more likely to be the victims of excessive use of force courtesy of the police force.

Between 2005 and April 2017, an astounding 80 officers had been arrested on murder or manslaughter charges for on-duty shootings. During that 12-year span, a paltry 35% were convicted of the crimes they committed, whilst the rest were pending judgments, or found not guilty. This means that since 2005, there have only been 13 officers convicted of murder or manslaughter in fatal on-duty shootings, according to data provided to The Huffington Post by Philip Stinson, an associate professor of criminology at Ohio’s Bowling Green State University.

What’s even more interesting is, according to research, it seems that if an officer on trial happens to be a person of color, he/she is more likely to be convicted and found guilty, while their white counterparts — who make up the majority of the convicted officers of racially biased shootings — get away with fewer repercussions.

Out of so many white officers who have been accused of fatal shootings, it took a brown officer from Florida to see true justice in the brutal, fatal shooting of a black man.

Controversial police shootings are not new and have been happening for decades, and so have protests for justice. In this day and age, however, the rise of social media has allowed ordinary civilians to attain a wider reach in their uproar and demands for social justice, forcing prosecutors and judges to take a harder  and more careful look at cases and officers involved in dubious interactions that leave a trail of fatalities.

Out of so many white officers who have been accused of fatal shootings, it took a brown officer from Florida to see true justice in the brutal, fatal shooting of a black man.

Most white officers are given an opportunity to resign (Raja was fired), or the opportunity to be suspended with pay, or end up having their cases dropped. Sometimes, these officers are protected via self defense laws, or other forms of “special” laws. Eventually, these very cops can be offered protection via a witness protection program, and be re-hired by a lower ranking and discreet county office where they are still “protecting” us civilians. Now, no one is defending what Raja did. He committed a crime against humanity, and his punishment is wholly justified. But we cannot permit the conviction of this one officer distract from the thousands of others who get away with murder. Police shootings must end in convictions irrespective of the ethnicity of the cop in question.

Injustice is a threat to justice everywhere. American police officers are using much deadlier force than their counterparts in other countries. And yet, in the United States — a place where access to police incident reports shouldn’t be scarce — there’s actually no legitimate data on how many people police kill each year per state. Somehow, there is no information about the officers involved in these shootings either. Does this actually sound acceptable in a country where officer-involved shootings are sky high?



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How Did a #HateCrimeHearing Devolve Into an Echo Chamber for White Nationalism?

How Did a #HateCrimeHearing Devolve Into an Echo Chamber for White Nationalism?

“February 10, 2015, that was the day our lives changed forever when my two daughters Yusor and Razan, and my son-in-law Deah, were shot to death execution style in Yusor and Deah’s home in Chapel Hill. When we arrived at the scene, yellow tape and […]

This Is How Quebec’s Islamophobia Dehumanizes Us

This Is How Quebec’s Islamophobia Dehumanizes Us

“How much could I give you to rip that off her head?” Just five men hanging out on the weekend. Taking bets on assaulting a woman with a young child living in the apartment above them. Such a casual proposition sent chills down my spine. […]

#WeStandWithNasrin: Why a Focus on Justice Needs to Be Central for Muslims Everywhere

#WeStandWithNasrin: Why a Focus on Justice Needs to Be Central for Muslims Everywhere


“Oh, you who believe, stand up for justice.”

We as Muslims have a call to be witnesses and advocates for justice as a central tenet of our faith. As such, in a country like the United States — which has withdrawn from the United Nations Human Rights Council — we have to work for our country to reestablish higher standards following the erosion of rights for Muslims, as well as the support for rights for Muslims both in the U.S. and internationally. We, as Muslims, are uniquely suited to this work.

Thus, the imprisonment of human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh stands out as a major issue for us as Muslims. Imprisoned in a trial that has been widely criticized as unfair, Sotoudeh was sentenced to up to nearly four decades in prison and 148 lashes for her human rights work in Iran. There are multiple questions this raises. First and foremost is that Iran, as a powerful voice against U.S. global hegemony has decided to take the approach to imprison a human rights lawyer and not lead in the arena of human rights. When the Iranian revolution took place, it was envisioned by many women as an opportunity to establish freedom for women. For a variety of reasons — I would argue resistance to U.S. global hegemony high on the list — this has not been the case.

The U.S. is currently facing isolation over its decision to withdraw from the 22015 treaty with Iran, a decision made by the Trump administration although all evidence suggests that Iran is abiding by it. This decision does a tremendous amount to further isolate the country from its allies.

France with its burkini ban and Iran with its mandatory hijab, are both guilty of the same human rights crime—limiting women’s freedom.

All over the world, governments are putting their laws on women’s bodies in the issue of the hijab. France with its burkini ban and Iran with its mandatory hijab, are both guilty of the same human rights crime — limiting women’s freedom. This legislation of women’s bodies has to cease.

We, as Muslims, need to be clear that one of the major issues facing us as a planet right now is our fundamental freedoms, and in a very real way Iran is protecting this. But Iran is pushing back wrong. We cannot be merely reactionary to the ignorant and oppressive Islamophobia of the U.S. and France with equally un-Islamic legal practices which make religious observances mandatory. Iran stands in a unique position to resist Islamophobia. This decision to publicly imprison and punish a peaceful human rights lawyer can only hurt that potential powerful position that Iran holds.

We, as Muslim women, need to be clear. This is not about Ilhan Omar’s hijab, nor about Nasrin Sotoudeh’s lack thereof.

My heart breaks for us as a community because we continue to struggle with Muslim leadership globally who do not work for our collective well-being, whether it be via Saudi attacks on Yemen and support for the persecution of the Uighur, or this Iranian government’s decision to imprison a peaceful, award-winning lawyer who represents Muslim women’s freedom to live according to their conscience. But in addition to that, my heart breaks for my sister, Nasrin Sotoudeh, and the women she defended. Her courage and dignity are amazing. That the Iranian government cannot see that, it is not in their best interest to provoke further stereotypes and tropes about misogynistic interpretations of Islam. In this vein, Iran imprisoning a peaceful woman merely for speaking out is obscene.

We, as Muslim women, need to be clear. This is not about Ilhan Omar’s hijab, nor about Nasrin Sotoudeh’s lack thereof. The issue we face as Muslim women is the issue we face as human beings; the challenge to create a free and peaceful world where our imagination is limited only by kindness. Just as #WeStandWithIlhan, we must also be vocal that #WeStandWithNasrin.

She should be freed immediately, and Iran needs to come forward as a human rights leader in the tradition of our Prophet, peace be upon him, rejecting the reactionary and retrogressive policies they have engaged in.  They need to stand with our tradition for justice. It will only benefit them and strengthen their ties to their E.U. allies who are trying to stand up to the U.S. It will only elevate their station as believers.



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Emotional Intelligence: A Tool for Change  

Emotional Intelligence: A Tool for Change  

  Why do we consider emotional intelligence to be half of the Prophetic intellect? The answer lies in the word “messenger.” Messengers of Allah are tasked with the divine responsibility of conveying to humanity the keys to their salvation. They are not only tasked with […]

5 Ways to Beat the Post-Shahada Blues

5 Ways to Beat the Post-Shahada Blues

For nearly eight years, I’ve navigated the murky waters of my chosen spiritual path. Both the outer and inner manifestations of faith can prove challenging for convert brothers and sisters. Over the years, my imaan has risen and fallen, but like the tide, I always […]

There’s Nothing Like Your First Muslim Women’s Day

There’s Nothing Like Your First Muslim Women’s Day


March 27th, 2019 was the first year that I was a part of Muslim Women’s Day. Girl! It was a day I will never forget. It soon became apparent that there was much celebration all over the world, and I found myself feeling particularly proud to be a part of such a powerful movement. Muslim Women’s Day gave me a sense of sisterhood. It provided an outlet and reason to express my thoughts and feelings to the world. It allowed me to not be silenced by ignorance. It provided an opportunity to many women to speak up and express who they are without worry.

For a movement that began in 2017, I was very happy and surprised by how the massive impact it has made on so many women. Women from all over the world were celebrating this campaign, and I found myself feeling thrilled for the many more to come. The Muslim Women’s Day campaign is still young, and yet we are making sure that the world hears our voices. We, as a whole, are no longer accepting silence as a means of expression. It is finally our turn to speak up and with great pleasure, we will!

Growing up, a lot of girls are taught to speak in a low tone, be dainty, act ladylike, and let a man take control of a situation. Luckily for me, I never really listened to those commandments. I was the girl who was looked at as very outspoken, borderline “disrespectful”. I was the girl who was viewed as aggressive because I was not willing to let anyone think they could bully me. Until this very day, I speak with a loud tone because I want to make sure that people hear what I have to say. Thank you, Patrick Swayze, because “No one puts baby in a corner!” I was not willing to ever be put in a corner.

Muslim Women’s Day provided this opportunity for us, as a community, to be stronger than those who try to bring us down.

Although it is taking longer than we expected, it is finally time that women of color have a voice and the opportunity to use it with great purpose. Becoming a part of Muslim Girl has truly changed my outlook on life. Being given the opportunity to write for this free-spoken platform provided a sense of relief. We can all finally share our stories, express ourselves authentically and at the same time be recognized for our struggles and accomplishments. Muslim Women’s Day provided this opportunity for us, as a community, to be stronger than those who try to bring us down. Word of advice to the haters, you’re wasting your time. Do you think a bunch of us are going to bend to your misogyny or gendered Islamophobia? THINK AGAIN!

I am going to take this opportunity to applaud the #MuslimGirlArmy because y’all are truly inspirational. You all have a story. You all stand for what you believe in regardless of what the ignorance of the world insists upon. You all provided a sense of unity for me. I have a second family, and for this reason, my first Muslim Women’s Day was indescribably memorable for me. I am so excited for the years to come! Let’s keep this movement going and with confidence and persistence. My Muslim Girl clique made this day special for me because I knew I was not celebrating this day alone. I know that Muslim Women’s Day is going to evolve, and society is going to learn to accept us as a norm, just the way we are. The time will come.

With that, I give my love, support, appreciation, and applause to all who were involved in creating this day, celebrating this day, and shedding light on this day. Y’all are the MVPs!



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Did These Muslims Really Try to Exploit the New Zealand Tragedy for Followers?

Did These Muslims Really Try to Exploit the New Zealand Tragedy for Followers?

When my eyes first fluttered open on Thursday morning, I was prepared for my morning routine of scrolling through Instagram and Twitter for an hour, and avoiding moving in general. I was not, however, prepared to see a giveaway post for a “free trip to […]